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SOLDERING

Category: Electronics
Brief Description

Soldering is defined as "the joining of metals by a fusion of alloys which have relatively low melting points". In other words, you use a metal that has a low melting point to adhere the surfaces to be soldered together.

Concept

Soldering is defined as "the joining of metals by a fusion of alloys which have relatively low melting points". In other words, you use a metal that has a low melting point to adhere the surfaces to be soldered together. Consider that soldering is more like gluing with molten metal, unlike welding where the base metals are actually melted and combined. Soldering is also a must have skill for all sorts of electrical and electronics work. It is also a skill that must be taught correctly and developed with practice.

EQUIPMENTS REQUIRED
  1. SOLDERING IRON
  2. SOLDERING WIRE
  3. DESOLDERING PUMP
SOLDERING IRON

A soldering iron is a hand tool used in soldering. It supplies heat to melt the solder so that it can flow into the joint between two work pieces.
A soldering iron is composed of a heated metal tip and an insulated handle. Heating is often achieved electrically, by passing an electric current (supplied through an electrical cord or battery cables) through a resistive heating element. Portable irons can be heated by combustion of gas stored in a small tank, often using a catalytic heater rather than a flame. Simple irons less commonly used than in the past were simply a large copper bit on a handle, heated in a flame.
Soldering irons are most often used for installation, repairs, and limited production work in electronics assembly. High-volume production lines use other soldering methods. Large irons may be used for soldering joints in sheet metal objects. Less common uses include pyrography (burning designs into wood) and plastic welding.

SOLDERING STAND

Every technician needs one of these on their workbench! It will hold our solder reels and the solder is fed through the guide. It has a handle, so it can easily be carried, and in can be wall mounted to be right there where you always need it.- The base is super heavy so even when the solder reel is nearly empty it will feed.

SOLDERING WIRE

Solder is an alloy (mixture) of tin and lead, typically 60% tin and 40% lead. It melts at a temperature of about 200°C. Coating a surface with solder is called tinning because of the tin content of solder. Lead is poisonous and you should always wash your hands after using solder.
Solder for electronics use contains tiny cores of flux, like the wires inside a mains flex. The flux is corrosive, like an acid, and it cleans the metal surfaces as the solder melts. This is why you must melt the solder actually on the joint, not on the iron tip. Without flux most joints would fail because metals quickly oxidize and the solder itself will not flow properly onto a dirty, oxidized, metal surface.
The best size of solder for electronics is 22swg (SWG = standard wire gauge).

SOLDERING TIPS

First a few safety precautions

Preparing Soldering Iron

You are now ready to start soldering



De Soldering

At some stage you will probably need to de solder a joint to remove or re-position a wire or component.
There are two ways to remove the solder:

1. With a de soldering pump (solder sucker)


2. solder remover wick (copper braid)


First aid tips